Thriving . . . Not Just Surviving: Rachell Kitchen

You either walk inside your story and own it or you stand outside your story and hustle for your worthiness.” – Brené Brown

Rachell Kitchen has faced significant trauma in her life, more than most people. She has not only survived the trauma, but she is thriving. I’m excited to introduce you to my friend Rachell, a Woman Making Strides who is also my life coach.

Rachell Kitchen photo by Pfeiffer Photography

Rachell Kitchen – photo by Pfeiffer Photography, Naperville, IL

Rachell lives in Aurora, Illinois, and has two grown children. She owns her own business, Level Up for Life Coach as a certified professional life and transition coach. She has been a coach for three years and is passionate about her work.

In recent years, Rachell has faced several traumatic life changes. A couple of years ago, both her Mom and her mother-in-law developed cancer. Rachell had a few breast cancer scares of her own. Her youngest child, Kyah, moved from Illinois to Ohio to California and then got married. Besides all this, Rachell faced betrayal that ended in divorce. And tragically, Rachell’s father was murdered during this time—beaten on the street by strangers.

As you can imagine, Rachell was a bit of a “hot mess”. “It was all traumatic, but the worst was sometimes feeling alone in it. Where I thought I ‘should be’ getting support, I wasn’t. But then I realized people would support me if I asked for what I needed.” Rachell gets teary-eyed when discussing the support she did receive. Her friend Chris accompanied her to Chicago for court cases for the murder trial regularly for 18 months and shielded her when the criminals’ relatives taunted her. “I am so grateful for Chris and other friends who supported me.”

She founded a meetup group (no longer active) called the West Suburban DIVAS. The purpose of the group was for women to come together for connection and support while enjoying activities and discussing self-improvement books. Leading the DIVAS helped her overcome perfectionism. One of the books that helped Rachell was Simple Abundance: A Daybook of Comfort and Joy by Sarah Ban Breathnach. The book led her to create a gratitude journal that changed her life as she learned to find things to be grateful for every day. That helped her focus on the good in people. On bad days, she picked up the gratitude journal and realized she did have abundance.

Rachell’s bad times led her to go on a path of self-discovery. She worked with a life coach, initially hoping to save her marriage. But the relationship that came out of that was a relationship with herself. Negativity from others had affected her self-worth, and she worked through this. Coaching helped her identify her own values and strengths.

This process helped Rachell to reinvent herself. There was a time when she was in victim-hood, feeling sorry for herself. Over time, she had an awakening. She realized the only person she could control was herself. That got her seeking out ways to be a better person. Through coaching, Rachell began to realize more of her own good qualities. She was a good listener and a person who empowered others. She also is a go-getter. These realizations about her strengths prompted Rachell to become a life coach herself. “I cashed in my IRA and enrolled in the best coaching school I could find.”

Rachell also realized, “You can have joy in the chaos.” The traumas she faced happened about the time she turned 50, and she wanted to celebrate that milestone birthday in a big way. Friends who were professional photographers offered to take pictures, so Rachell participated in a photo shoot. As it turns out, the photos have been helpful in her business.

Rachell in white dress

Image from Rachell’s photo shoot by Pfeiffer Photography, Naperville, IL

In her business, Rachell offers individual life coaching as well as group coaching, public speaking, and writing. A recent group coaching was a 5-week program called “Take Charge of Your Life: Rewire Your Brain for Confidence, Focus, & Taking Action.” People participated by video or audio conferencing. Rachell loves all aspects of her work, but especially individual coaching. “There’s nothing better than when I can witness someone feeling empowered. Their idea of who they are and what they’re capable of shifts. I’m humbled to have a little part of empowering them to see their own greatness. But it’s not about me. It’s about them shifting their limiting beliefs.”

She is proud to have created a 5-day summit called “Divorced and Thriving Summit” to help divorced women reinvent themselves. “Women need resources to deal with divorce. You can lose your friends, your social network, finances. It is overwhelming to not just start over, but to thrive.”

Most of Rachell’s clients are women, and she enjoys helping them deal with transition until they can do it on their own. Rachell says, “How can we live in alignment with our values? We get overwhelmed; we make so many decisions every day. It is powerful for women to step into that place where they’re more self-aware and in tune with their goals and to make decisions from that place. When we get in alignment with our values, we can change the world.” Improving ourselves can influence our children to lead better lives, and Rachell has seen this ripple effect in her own children.

Words matter to Rachell, and she is a contributing author for three books: Woman Thriving Fearlessly in Business, #Sisterhood Connection: A Year of Empowerment, and The One Thing Every Mom Needs to Know. She says, “It matters how we show up in the world. That’s what I’m passionate about. Don’t just survive . . . thrive!” But she does more than say words, she is living the words.

When not working on her business, Rachell loves to cook. She is currently writing a book about life lessons, which will include recipes. For example, after she moved Kyah into an apartment in Ohio for her first “real” job, Rachell was distraught and let herself cry for 20 minutes. But then she asked herself “How do I want to show up?” She decided “I want to lean in.” She decided to make herself something new to embrace her new life. So she made roasted eggplant and ate it on her best china.

Rachell's simple roasted eggplant with thyme

Rachell’s simple roasted eggplant with thyme

Running is another activity that helped Rachell get through her traumas. She has been running since 2013. At first, she ran to lose weight, but that has shifted to “I want to be in good health so I can be of service to other people.” For a time, she was part of a fun run club where she found friends with similar interests. Rachell’s first race was the Chicago Half Marathon, and now she has run 14 half marathons. You may remember that Rachell ran with me during my first half marathon, which I discussed here. Rachell’s goal is to run in every state in the U.S., and she has run in 11 states so far.

Rachell likes to run alone and be with her own thoughts. One day, early in the morning, she saw 15 to 20 deer at the local arboretum, and some came close. She says, “I felt the most connected with God during that time. Early in the morning, answers would come to me. Clarity would come. I was struggling with my faith at the time but realized that church and God and Spirit is in me. I became connected with my Lord and Savior on the trails.”

Rachell loves to run in winter

Rachell loves to run in winter

For self-care, Rachell continues to work with her own life coaches, still working on feeling whole and healthy. She says affirmations and does visualizations. She journals and meditates, sometimes sitting quietly and being alone in her head. She also gets manicures, pedicures, and facials. Rachell has learned to say No. “I try to do self-honoring acts, so when I’m tired, I rest.” She schedules Pajama Days where she wears cozy pajamas all day and stays home, relaxing and taking downtime.

I asked Rachell if she has any role models. “Oprah is one of my role models, and what I admire about her is her tenacity. She was fired from a network that said she wasn’t suited for television. She has struggled with her weight all her life. She’s not afraid to show vulnerability. She is that caring, nurturing soul. She holds space for people to discover what they need in that moment.” Rachell also admires the work of Brené Brown and has found the book Rising Strong: How the Ability to Reset Transforms the Way We Live, Love, Parent, and Lead to be helpful. The quote by Brené Brown that began this post is one of her favorite quotes.

I asked Rachell if she has any tips for us. She said, “For women especially, you want to unapologetically own your feelings. You want to powerfully ask for what you want and need. Set and hold boundaries that support you, what you care about most, and your goals.”

Finally, I asked Rachell, “What do you attribute your strength to? What stops you from feeling like “poor me”? She said part of it is her faith, part is how she is made. “I may sit and lick my wounds for a minute, but then I’m able to catapult into a higher levels of energy.” As Kyah pointed out to her, one of her biggest strengths is her capacity to love. “I use it in coaching, relationships, and networking. God wants the best for us and for us to use the gifts He’s given us and that is the undercurrent of what motivates me. We have an obligation to use our gifts and to be on our best path.”

What traumas have you experienced? How have you dealt with them? Please share your thoughts in the comments below.

Posted in Bad days, Body, mind, spirit, Challenges, Empowerment, Inspiration, Intentional Living, Leading Ourselves, personal leadership, Running | Tagged , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

Looking Back, Looking Ahead

It’s better to look ahead and prepare, than to look back and regret.” Jackie Joyner-Kersee

I’ve started a blog post on another topic, but this time of year, I feel compelled to write about the New Year. In this blog, we try to be proactive. A new year is a great time to assess our lives and whether we want to change direction.

It is worth taking time to reflect on the past year. If you’re like me, you succeeded in some areas, but not all. I looked over last year’s resolutions and was dismayed at how few I’d actually achieved. In looking at my resolutions, almost all I had to do was to replace 2019 by 2020, and they would work for this year. At least, that was my first impression.

I took another look and realized that I’d succeeded more than I thought. For instance, some of my goals were that I’d walk or run every day. I’d write every day. I’d pray every day. But how realistic was that? I did these things most days. In my resolutions for 2020, I will say “most days” rather than “every day.”

I said I’d write two mystery stories in 2019. Well, I didn’t. But I did write a short fiction story that will be included in an anthology. That is still something to celebrate. I did “take fun vacations” as I’d planned and lived with “joie de vivre,” my guiding phrase for the year. And I did nurture my creativity.

Photo from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:New-Year_Resolutions_list.jpg

If you achieved all your goals in 2019, I applaud you. That’s something to celebrate. Setting and achieving goals is important. If you didn’t achieve your goals, remember that life is about more than goals. We can assess the past year in a positive light anyway. What can you celebrate about last year? What were your wins? Did you gain in self-compassion or compassion for others? Did you enjoy the year? Did you grow in some way? Those might not have been your goals, but they are worth celebrating.

We can also think about the past year in terms of the lessons we learned. We don’t need to be mean to ourselves or berate ourselves, but it is good to be honest. For instance, I did very little writing on the mystery novel I wanted to write. Maybe it’s time I reconsider this goal. Is it still a high priority for me? If it is, why aren’t I working on it?

I see that I had too much anxiety throughout the year, especially around the holidays. I don’t want that to happen this year. That is why I’ve chosen the guiding word “tranquility” for 2020. This idea can affect much of my life. I can use the word tranquility to guide me when making decisions. I can make my home and work environment more serene. Physical exercise can help me relax. Being outdoors in nature helps relieve my anxiety, so if weather permits, I can exercise outdoors. And I can become more tranquil by nurturing my relationship with God.

I hope you enjoy a happy and healthy New Year in 2020. If you have goals for the year ahead, writing them down is a good start towards making them happen.

Have you taken a kind, but honest look at your past year? Do you have goals or a guiding word for the year ahead?

Posted in Goals, Holidays, Intentional Living, Proactive | Tagged , , , | 8 Comments

A Change of Seasons

When the seasons shift, even the subtle beginning, the scent of a promised change, I feel something stir inside me. Hopefulness? Gratitude? Openness? Whatever it is, it’s welcome.” – Kristin Armstrong

Over the summer, my daughter’s manager asked me to speak about this blog to their department. Even though the presentation was for a small group, I at first felt like screaming and running from the room. I’ve done some public speaking, but not recently, not regarding my blog, and not at my daughter’s workplace. I feel strongly about the mission for Women Making Strides, so I gathered my courage and prepared a talk on the topic “Pause and Reflect on Your Self-Care.”

If you’ve been reading my blog, you know its mission:

A woman who makes strides appreciates being alive and takes active steps to care for her body, mind, and spirit. She accepts challenges along her path and uses her God-given talents to better the world.”

You also have an idea what the talk was like. Like my blog posts, the talk included quotes by women and questions for the listeners to reflect on. A change of seasons is a good time to reflect. After my own reflection, I realized this presentation was the most significant event of my summer. I had to overcome fear to give the talk, and I worked hard on it. It was worth doing, although only five people attended. What was significant for you this summer?

Summer flew by for me but was filled with joie de vivre. My husband Ken and I went to several concerts and a polo match. We had guests from out of town, and we went into Chicago a couple of times. We went to a Worldwide Marriage Encounter convention and enjoyed a dinner cruise on the Ohio River.

The highlight of our summer was a vacation trip to England, Wales, and Scotland. Many of my favorite books and TV shows are set in these countries. We saw the play Mousetrap by Agatha Christie when we were in London, and we went to Highclere Castle in Hampshire, England, where Downton Abbey was filmed. There was much variety on this trip, from castles to shows to watching a Scottish shepherd guide his sheep dogs by whistling. What were the high points of your summer?

Cairngorms National Park, Scotland
Eilean Donan castle – Scottish Highlands, photo by Ken Ekins
Ken and me in front of Blair Castle, Scotland

A couple of low points this summer consisted of me falling. The first time, I sprained my ankle when I stepped in a deep hole outside the convention center. It was a mild sprain, so six weeks later, I went running at our local arboretum. Suddenly I was flat on my face. I had fallen and landed hard on my front teeth on pavement. I had scrapes and bruises and damaged my glasses. What were the low points of your summer?

After these two falls, my initial instinct was to give up running. But after thinking about it, I decided to work on my balance and try to avoid distractions—both times I fell, I was carrying something.

I learned something else this summer at a WW (formerly Weight Watchers) meeting. A woman stated that her goal was to walk from her front door to her back door twice that week. I don’t know her history and I’m not judging, but I thought, “For me, that seems like a tiny step, although maybe it isn’t for her. What tiny step do I need to take?” I realized I needed to get back to running after my falls. I had been procrastinating because I feared falling again. Also, I needed to get back to tracking WW points. That day, I took these “tiny” steps. For both that woman and me, it was so much better to take those steps than to do nothing. And next week maybe we’ll both do a little more. What did you learn this summer? What tiny step do you need to take?

Looking ahead to autumn, I’d like to lose about five pounds before the holidays. I am looking forward to Northern Illinois University’s homecoming (This post explains why. ) Also I plan to take part in National Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo) in November. What do you look forward to this Autumn?

You may have noticed it’s been awhile since I’ve written a blog post. My most recent blog post was published on June 21, but I’ve been writing this blog for seven years. I took a break from writing this summer and reflected on whether I wanted to continue writing it.

But giving that presentation revived me and reminded me of the importance of the Women Making Strides mission. We women in particular often put our own needs last. But the world seems a bit crazy nowadays. People are lashing out at each other, sometimes in violent ways. I wonder if we all took better care of ourselves and lived by the Women Making Strides mission, might we be better able to deal with our “crazy” world? Might there be more people who would treat others with kindness rather than lashing out? This blog is my small effort to make the world a better place.

I ran out of business cards recently, and my daughter Katie, who is a graphic designer, freshened up the design for me. Placing the order online, I paused when saw the $42 fee. Was I really committed to writing the blog? I decided “Yes.”

And I signed up for life coaching again, because I want support for my efforts to be a Woman Making Strides and for my dream of finishing my mystery novel and getting it published. Life is short, and I don’t want to let my dreams slide. What are your dreams?

I’m also reaching out for your support. If you have suggestions for this blog or ideas for blog posts, please let me know. And if you like my posts, please share on social media, post a comment, or “like” them. Thank you.

Posted in Making a Difference, Proactive, self-care | Tagged , | 8 Comments

Listening for Inspiration

I have seen the healing power of good listening so often that I wonder if you’ve noticed it also. . . . Listening moves us closer, it helps us become more whole, more healthy, more holy.” – Margaret J. Wheatley

We discussed listening to music for inspiration and pleasure in this post. But what else can we listen to for inspiration?

Friends have told me they listen to podcasts or audio books while they run, walk or drive. That didn’t appeal to me at first, but recently I started listening to podcasts while I’m cooking, doing dishes or exercising. It makes routine chores more interesting, and I enjoy it.

Listening for Inspiration – photo from http://www.pexels.comphotowoman-wearing-black-jacket-with-white-headphones-775034

One of my favorite people to listen to is Jamie Ridler at Jamie Ridler Studios. When I first started listening to Jamie’s podcasts, I thought, “She is so creative and encouraging of her listeners to be creative. She sees it as good to spend time doing what she loves and reflecting on life. What if I watched or listened to uplifting things like that in the morning?”

Jamie says, “I truly believe that by awakening our creative capacity, we will not only change our lives for the better, but also the world!” If you are looking for support and inspiration for your creativity, I recommend Jamie’s work. She has a gentle manner, and she encourages us to be creative and to treat ourselves well.

Another of my favorite podcasts is Tea and Tattle, “a podcast that celebrates female creativity and success.” Miranda Mills is the host of these podcasts and often co-hosts with her best friend, Sophie Perdito. They interview successful women. Some are authors, some entrepreneurs, some photographers or bloggers. Sometimes they interview someone unique, such as Yasmine Naghdi, a Principal dancer of the Royal Ballet. I feel inspired when I hear these women’s stories and what led them to their success. Tea and Tattle podcasts also include book discussions, travel tips, and more.

And what about listening to friends and relatives? Sometimes I resist what a friend says, but later, I realize they were right or at least partly right.

Sometimes the best person to listen to ourselves. I have developed a new habit of talking to myself. Before you think I’m losing my mind, let me explain. When I go for walks in quiet places, I sometimes speak into my smart phone, discussing an issue that I’m facing. I play back the recording and listen to what I said. I find that this is as effective as journaling as a way to find clarity. It is also a way to coach myself.

I wish I’d listened to myself yesterday. My body was aching, so I laid down on the couch. But instead of letting myself rest, I berated myself. “What is it with you, Sue? You’re either stressed when you have a lot on your plate or depressed and listless when you don’t.” It may have been better to be more compassionate to myself and ask, “What might be causing my aches? Might I be getting sick?” Instead, I got up almost immediately and pushed myself to get something done. A little later, I went for a 3-mile run with a friend and pushed myself to run the whole way. It turns out I was getting sick. I had fevers and chills during the night. Although my fever is gone, I’m still sore and wonder if I’d be feeling better if I’d listened to my body and let myself rest yesterday.

I’ve also realized it’s good to think about what we are listening to and ask if it is serving us. I used to tune to a radio station that gives news, traffic, and weather. I wasted time listening to this station given that there is a lot of repetition and commercials. It is better to check that station as needed than to leave it on for a long time.

Finally, what about listening to God? My husband and I occasionally give presentations for our Worldwide Marriage Encounter community. I think our presentations are improved when we pray and are open to guidance. I also pray that God will guide me before publishing blog posts.

How has listening to yourself or others inspired you? Do you have any favorite podcasts?

Posted in Inspiration, Proactive, self-care | Tagged , | 7 Comments

Lessons Learned from Running . . . for Life

Life is for participating, not for spectating.” Kathrine Switzer

This is a different blog post from what I intended to write. Over the past few months, I trained for my third annual half-marathon and faced some challenges. My intention was to write an inspiring post about how I overcame the challenges and completed the race. Unfortunately, I did not succeed in even getting to the start line. We had a late-spring snowfall yesterday in the Chicago suburbs. The roads were icy last night, and the temperature was predicted to be 32 degrees Fahrenheit at the start of the race. I decided not to risk falling on icy patches or slick roads. Years ago, when I was 45, I sprained an ankle. It took many months to recover, and I still don’t have good balance. The risk of falling isn’t worth it to me.

photo from Naperville Women's Half Marathon - winner Katie Paolucci

Photo from Naperville Women’s Half Marathon – winner Katie Paolucci

This would be disheartening if I hadn’t learned from the experience. Mostly I trained alone, which gave me plenty of time to reflect on lessons learned from my running—and how they apply to life. Here is what I learned:

  • My long runs were six, seven, eight, and nine miles. Then I got injured (very tight IT bands, which go from the hip to below the knees.) I couldn’t run at all for 20 days. I tried soaking in Epsom salts, foam rolling, stretching, but still it was painful even to walk. Lesson for life: Know when to stop or take a break.
  • During that time, I decided that a pedicure was a necessity because my feet hurt, so I got one. Also, after recovering from the injury, I decided to do my next long run with a friend, Gladys. That would be the most pleasant way to get in eight miles—and Gladys pushed me to do nine instead. Lesson for Life: Do what you can to succeed.
  • Over the Christmas holidays and beyond, I indulged in sweets and was inactive, partly due to a rough winter in the Chicago area. Maybe I wouldn’t have been as injured if I’d kept in better shape year-round, instead of going from couch-potato to training for a half marathon. Lesson for Life: Take care of your health consistently.
  • I was fine when I ran alone or with Gladys. But I might have pushed too hard when trying to keep up with a faster-paced group without Gladys. Lesson for Life: Go your own pace.
  • On the other hand, we can’t improve if we don’t run faster or farther sometimes. I could have tried to keep up with the faster runners for a shorter distance. Or I could run with someone who is only a little faster than me. Lesson for Life: Push hard sometimes!
  • When running on my own, I listened to music and enjoyed the scenery. That made my running much more enjoyable. Lesson for Life: Enjoy the journey.

photo of daffodils that I took while enjoying a run

Photo of daffodils that I took while enjoying a run

  • Some of my runs were difficult, but I learned that dwelling on the difficulty or my inadequacies didn’t accomplish anything. On the other hand, I know my situation better than anyone. So listen to myself—as long as I am talking to myself in a positive, constructive way. Lesson for Life: Persevere when it gets tough. Coach yourself in a positive way.
  • A couple of weeks ago, I ran a 5K race. I had just recovered from my injury, and I found the run challenging. I thought I was running very slowly. But I came in third place out of the 17 women in my age group. Lesson for Life: You’re doing better than you think.
  • Recently, I heard young people talking about how they’d overdone their workouts. One of them wasn’t able to get out of bed after a strenuous two-hour workout. So it is not my age that makes running difficult. Lesson for Life: Age is not a factor.
  • Yesterday when I was making my decision, I talked to my friend Cindy, who is a meteorologist, about my concerns. She said, “I’m thinking you should follow your gut. Temps will be at or below freezing for the half-marathon.” Isn’t that great advice for life: Follow your gut. Still, I wondered if I was making the right decision. I was at a dinner event last night, and a friend had his arm in a sling due to rotator cuff surgery. He will not have full use of his shoulder for a year, and he got this injury from falling on ice. Lesson for Life: Trust your gut.
  • The training was worthwhile, even though I didn’t do the race. I was in better shape than before I started the training, and wasn’t that the whole point? Lesson for Life: Keep chasing your dreams.
  • I thought about doing the 13.1 miles on my own after the race (when the roads weren’t slippery.) But the truth is I wasn’t in great shape for today’s race. The excitement of running a race and running with Gladys would have carried me through the 13.1 miles. But I’d intended to run faster than in past years and I wasn’t on track for that. Granted, I was injured, but I didn’t lose weight or develop more fitness to help my running. Lesson for Life: Honor your commitments to yourself.
  • I was disappointed, but to put it in perspective, we go through a lot worse experiences than this in life. We just need to keep on putting one foot in front of the other. Lesson for Life: Learn from your disappointments and try again.
  • I went out and did half the distance (6.6 miles) today in the afternoon after the ice melted. It felt inadequate compared to a half-marathon, and it was bittersweet to listen to the theme song from Chariots of Fire, which had inspired me during my training. But I suspect it is possible that someone was watching me and wishing they could run 6.6 miles. I will give myself a day of recovery and do another 6.6 mile run in a couple of days. Lessons for Life: Challenge yourself, but know your limits. Find a way to succeed that works for you.

Will I try again, next year? Yes. I will start training sooner so I’m more fit when the race comes, rather than being “sort of” ready. If the roads are icy, I still won’t run the race. But if that happens, I hope I will be able to run the full 13.1 miles on my own without a lot of discomfort.

So remember, when you have a disappointment, keep the faith. Pick yourself back up, learn from it, and move on.

Have you tried to do something and been disappointed with yourself? What did you learn from that experience?

Posted in Bad days, Challenges, Running, self-improvement | Tagged , , , | 9 Comments

Developing Good Habits

Just because you’re struggling with self-discipline doesn’t mean you have to raise the white flag and declare your self-improvement efforts a complete failure. Instead, work to increase the chances that you’ll stick to your healthier habits – even when you don’t feel like it.” Amy Morin

If you find it easy to develop new and better habits, that impresses me. Some people can see the value in a new habit and simply start doing it. That is seldom true for me. I find it difficult to overcome resistance.

In December, a friend mentioned that every day, she walks or runs at least one mile. I thought, “That seems doable! It would be so much better than nothing,” which is what I was doing some days. It is so easy to get lethargic around the holidays and in winter. But starting on January 1, I’ve been walking or running at least a mile (often more) every day.

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Developing Good Habits – Photo by Tobi from Pexels

Our goals, of course, have to be right for us. My running friends might consider a mile a day to be nothing, whereas sedentary friends might consider it to be a lot. We each have to start with where we’re at. Someone who doesn’t walk at all could start with walking one block a day. That can lead to more walking.

Establishing new habits doesn’t need to be drudgery. Every day, I ask myself what is the most pleasant way to get my walk in? Weather permitting, it is most pleasant to walk or run outside. But winter has been rough this year in the Chicago area. Sometimes I walk with my husband Ken outside, even on snowy sidewalks. If it’s very cold or slick, I do a mall walk with a friend, walk on a treadmill, or walk on an indoor track with Ken. I’ve also run with a friend at a track a few times. Some days have been dangerously cold or slick outside, so I walked inside the house for 20 minutes while listening to a podcast or music.

I started another good habit this year that is consistent with my writing goals. Since January 1, I’ve been working on my mystery novel every day. I add at least 200 words a day, and I also subtract words as I edit and tighten my first draft.

Baby steps are what helped me develop this good habit. I took the following baby steps to get writing on my mystery:

  • I started by journaling daily last year. For me, this was easier and less scary than writing fiction.

  • I joined a group that held me accountable for writing 100 words a day.

  • Next I increased to writing 200 words a day.

  • Then I only counted writing if it was on my novel or a short story. I’ve committed to write 6 days out of 7, but so far, I’m writing daily.

I’ve been wanting to write a mystery novel for at least a decade. The truth is, it has taken a lot more steps than the above to get to this point. But it is so much better to take a baby step towards one’s goals, then to go backwards or do nothing.

In developing new habits, it helps to have a support group, supportive friend, or someone to hold us accountable. I’m a new member of the Sisters in Crime organization and joined their Goals subgroup. I post my writing goals for the week and whether I met last week’s goals. The people are encouraging, and they cheer when I meet my goals. Some women write a huge amount every day, but I am not going to let that bother me. I am starting with where I’m at—a novice mystery writer.

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Developing Good Habits – Photo by Startup Stock Photos from Pexels

It can help to reward ourselves when trying to establish a new habit. I am still trying to lose weight. I had developed the bad habit of snacking on sweets during the day. There are often baked goods at the church where I work. Every time I pass up a baked good, I pat myself on the back, sometimes literally. At home, I try to grab a cup of herbal tea instead of a sweet. However, I’ve decided to go back to my weight-management workshop. A good friend questioned why I need that support. Why can’t I do it on my own? We are all different, and even though she might not need support, I do.

Do you find it difficult or easy to establish a new habit? How do you do it?

Posted in Discipline, Goals, Healthy living, Inspiration, Motivation, personal leadership | Tagged , , | 11 Comments

Joie de Vivre in the New Year

Joie de vivre is an attitude. It’s a decision you make to live a life of joy. It’s an invitation to this dance called life.” – Jamie Cat Callan

The holiday season has drawn to a close, having gone by far too quickly. And here we are in a new year. I took a look back at 2018, deciding to assess my year with self-compassion. My guiding words for the year were “focus” and “courage.” Writing 50,000 words in November required both focus and courage, as did running a half marathon in April. These were big accomplishments for me, but my running habit dropped off after the half marathon, and I gained weight during the holidays. I’d like to have focus and courage year round and also write and run year round. But noticing this doesn’t feel like self-compassion, so I’ll stop listing what I didn’t do.

What resolutions did I meet in 2018 besides the half-marathon and adding to my novel? My husband and I cleared out a fair amount of clutter from our house. We traveled to Israel, and I was fit enough to walk a lot and enjoy it. I nurtured my creativity with morning pages (journaling) and artist dates. I enhanced my spirituality by taking a class in Benedictine spirituality.

sara paretsky - author and founder of sisters in crime

Sara Paretsky – author and founder of Sisters in Crime, photo from Wikimedia

At the end of the year, I joined Sisters in Crime, an organization that offers advice and support to mystery authors. I also signed up for Murder and Mayhem, a mystery conference in March. These are signs that I’m finally taking my mystery writing seriously.

Looking ahead to 2019, I considered many words to guide the year. Serene. Joyful. Confident. Creative. Proactive. Balanced. Living with gusto. Savoring life. Self-respect. So many great choices. I decided on “joie de vivre,” a French phrase that translates loosely as joy of living. The French meaning is a little stronger, more like exhilaration. I loved visiting France a few years ago, and I want to go back someday, so the French phrase appeals to me. Too often, I feel anxious or fearful. This year, I want to be joyful instead.

I want to be proactive in writing and running, but I don’t want to be stressed while working toward goals. This year, I want to enjoy life, savor life, and be nice to myself. I can be joyful while working to be a mystery author. I can be joyful while working to get back in shape. Focusing on joie de vivre should help.

In the new year, my resolutions are, as usual, much like my past resolutions, including fitness and writing goals. And that’s OK. I’m excited about being in Sisters in Crime and learning more about how to write mysteries. I hope to finish writing my mystery novel in 2019. And I will do it with joie de vivre.

I wish you a Happy New Year with joie de vivre in 2019.

Do you have a guiding word for 2019? What is it? Do you live with joie de vivre?

Posted in Goals, Holidays, Inspiration, positive-thinking | Tagged , , | 9 Comments